Donate now

Blood and Water: Menschenrechtsverletzungen in der weltweiten Fischereiindustrie: Dieser Bericht belegt klar und deutlich, dass Menschenrechtsverletzungen in der Fischereiindustrie nach wie vor weit verbreitet sind. Im Detail aufgeführt werden Fälle von Sklaverei und Schuldknechtschaft, unsäglichen Arbeits- und Lebensbedingungen an Bord sowie von physischer und sexueller Gewalt und sogar Mord auf Fischereischiffen. Die gesammelten Fallstudien betreffen Schiffe aus insgesamt 13 Ländern, die auf drei verschiedenen Ozeanen operierten.

Ratgeber zur Risikoprüfung von Fischereilieferketten: Der Ratgeber hilft Einzelhändlern und Unternehmen dabei, ihre Lieferketten frei von Produkten aus illegaler Fischerei zu halten. Er wurde gemeinsam von der Environmental Justice Foundation (EJF), WWF Deutschland und dem Waren-Verein der Hamburger Börse e. V. entwickelt und listet konkrete Maßnahmen, um die Risiken durch illegalen Fang einzuschätzen und abzumindern.

Out of the shadows: Improving transparency in global fisheries to stop illegal, unreported and unregulated fishing: This report lays out the ‘ten principles for global transparency in the fishing industry’. These simple, low-cost measures – which include publishing license lists and giving vessels unique numbers – are well within the reach of any country and can play a pivotal role in the battle against illegal fishing and human rights abuse in the sector.

10 หลักการเพื่อความโปร่งใสในอุตสาหกรรมประมงและอาหารทะเลทั่วโลก - ฉบับภาษาไทย Ten principles of transparency: ความโปร่งใสเป็นเครื่องมือที่ดีที่สุดในการต่อสู้กับปัญหาการทำประมงผิดกฎหมายและการละเมิดสิทธิมนุษยชนในอุตสาหกรรมอาหารทะเล ด้วยเหตุนี้ มูลนิธิความยุติธรรมเชิงสิ่งแวดล้อม (EJF) จึงได้จัดทำหลักการด้านความโปร่งใส 10 ข้อ เพื่อแนวทางในการปฎิบัติให้แก่นานาประเทศ

Fish in disguise: Seafood fraud in Korea: A year-long DNA test by EJF found that one out of three seafood samples in South Korea were wrongly labelled. This report provides a breakdown of the species most commonly mislabelled, illustrates the costs to people and the marine environment, and makes urgent recommendations for improving transparency in the Korean seafood system.

Thailand’s progress in combating IUU, forced labour & human trafficking: While Thailand has been making progress in its efforts to eradicate illegal fishing and human rights abuse, issues remain. This updated briefing outlines these issues and presents recommendations to address them.

Securing equitable and sustainable fisheries: The case for greater transparency in the management and governance of Ghana’s fisheries sector: Transparency must be improved to eradicate illegal fishing and prevent the collapse of Ghana’s fishing industry, says this new report from the Far Dwuma Nkɔdo project, which lays out key measures that can be implemented immediately by the government.

Out of the shadows: Korean Version: This report lays out the ‘ten principles for global transparency in the fishing industry’. These simple, low-cost measures – which include publishing license lists and giving vessels unique numbers – are well within the reach of any country and can play a pivotal role in the battle against illegal fishing and human rights abuse in the sector.

The ten principles for global transparency: Transparency in the fishing industry is the best weapon we have against the twin tragedies of illegal fishing and human rights abuse in the sector. EJF has collated ten simple principles for states to follow.

Out of the shadows: Improving transparency in global fisheries to stop illegal, unreported and unregulated fishing: This report lays out the ‘ten principles for global transparency in the fishing industry’. These simple, low-cost measures – which include publishing license lists and giving vessels unique numbers – are well within the reach of any country and can play a pivotal role in the battle against illegal fishing and human rights abuse in the sector.

Protecting the guardians of our seas: Recommendations for a national plan of action for Liberia’s sharks and rays: Loss of sharks can lead to dramatic imbalances in marine ecosystems. This is particularly significant in Liberia, where 33,000 people rely on the fishing industry for their livelihoods, and 65% of all animal protein eaten comes from seafood.

China’s hidden fleet in West Africa: a spotlight on illegal practices within Ghana’s industrial trawl sector: Around 90% of Ghana’s industrial fishing fleet is linked to Chinese ownership, despite the fact that Ghana’s laws clearly forbid any foreign ownership or control of vessels flying its flag. The Chinese and Ghanaian governments must now work together to eradicate the illegal fishing practices.